Lamb and mint sausages

Lamb and mint are a classic flavour combination in these quick and easy sausages. Experiment with different meats and herbs until you find your perfect sausage!

Ingredients

Preparation method

  1. Place all the ingredients except the oil in a large bowl and mix well with clean hands. Shape the mixture into about eight sausages.
  2. Heat the oil in a wide pan and gently fry the sausages for 6-8 minutes or until cooked through.

Chicken leg tagine with prunes, apricots and roasted almonds

The warm flavours of cinnamon, dried fruits and chicken make this tagine a Moroccan classic.

Ingredients

Preparation method

  1. In a large bowl, mix half of the onion, half of the garlic, half of the coriander and half of the parsley. Add 2 tablespoons of the olive oil, the lemon juice, 1 teaspoon of the ginger, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon and the turmeric and season well with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Rub the chicken legs with the mixture to coat.
  2. Cover the bowl with cling film and leave to marinade for 2-3 hours, or, for best results, overnight in the fridge.
  3. Preheat the oven to 180C/350F/Gas 4.
  4. Heat 1 tablespoon of olive oil in a frying pan. Fry the chicken on both sides until slightly brown and set aside.
  5. Put the remaining olive oil, onion, garlic and 1 teaspoon of ginger into a tagine or into an ovenproof pot with a lid. Stir the mixture and place the chicken on top.
  6. Heat the saffron in a dry pan and sprinkle it over the chicken. Sprinkle some freshly ground black pepper and 2 teaspoon cinnamon over the chicken and add a splash of water. Crumble the stock cube into the water and sprinkle with the remaining fresh parsley and coriander.
  7. Bake in the oven with the lid on for about 1 hour, or until tender.
  8. In a saucepan, cover the dried prunes with water and bring to the boil. Add half of the sugar and 1 teaspoon of cinnamon. Turn down the heat and let the prunes simmer until caramelised.
  9. In another saucepan, cover the apricots with water and bring to the boil. Add the rest of the sugar and the rest of the cinnamon. Turn down the heat and let the apricots simmer until caramelised.
  10. Check the tagine regularly, making sure that the sauce doesn’t dry.
  11. To serve, garnish the tagine with the caramelised prunes and apricots and the toasted almonds.

Beef and honey stew

Honey gives a comforting sweetness to this slow-cooked stew. 

Ingredients

Preparation method

  1. Place the flour in a freezer bag then add the cubes of meat and shake well to coat.
  2. Heat the oil in a large pan and brown the meat on all sides. (Do this in batches as adding too much meat at once makes the meat steam rather than brown.)
  3. Fry the onion in the same pan you used for the meat, adding more oil if needed. Once the onion is browned, add the carrots, leeks, turnip, honey and beef stock and return the meat to the pan.
  4. Add everything to a slow Cooker or Römertopf and simmer the stew over a very low heat for at least six hours – the longer it cooks, the better it will be. If you have no slow cooker or Römertopf you can also use a tagine.
  5. About 40 minutes before serving, add the potato to the stew (adding them at this point means they keep their shape). Season, to taste, with sea salt and freshly ground black pepper before serving. Sometimes I add dumplings made with flour and stale bread (semmelknödel) instead of potatoes.

History of the Cork Hebrew Congregation and the Jews of Cork.

History of the Cork Hebrew Congregation and the Jews of Cork. 
The first wave of Jewish emigration to Cork was in 1772 with the influx of a small community of Sephardic Jews from Portugal.
Relatively little is known about this first community. Although they didn’t have a synagogue, a burial ground was discovered at Kemp Street, to the back of the present synagogue on number 10, South Terrace.
The community didn’t exceed about 40 in number, and disappeared through intermarriage with local Protestant families.
Written records from 1891 point to the emergence of a second Jewish community in Cork, following the assimilation of the previous Sephardic community. This community, by contrast, were Ashkenazi, coming (mostly) from a town called Yakmyan in Kovno (former White Russia).
It is very unlikely that Cork, Ireland, was the intended destination of these Eastern European émigrés. They had fled persecution (pogroms) in a staunchly Catholic Country.

Many among their ranks were also very religious. That they would willingly come to another stronghold of Catholicism, such as Ireland, with no traditional ties to Judaism, seems mostly unlikely. Among various explanations proposed, it may have been the case that an unscrupulous ship-captain advised the Jews to disembark and row to America to save money.
Possibly they confused ‘Cork’ for New York (the Jews spoke only Yiddish, and the words are – slighly – cognate). From Cobh (then Queenstown), where they disembarked, the Jews made their way into Cork City, and specifically settled in an area known as Hibernian Buildings, in the City Centre, soon to be known as ‘Jewtown’ by the locals.
This initial crop of Jews worked mostly as peddlers, selling door-to-door. They were known, amongst each other, as the vicklemen (vickle means weekly in Yiddish, and their door-to-door rounds took roughly a week). They would travel around Cork City and its hinterland knocking on doors and selling various things to the local Catholic farming community.

The community reached its peak in the early 20th Century. Family of the first arrivals soon followed when they found out that Cork, and Ireland in general, was tolerant, even friendly, towards the Jews. The community first prayed in a small room in Eastville before renting a room in Marlboro Street, and finally building the present synagogue at 10, South Terrace.

A Jewish cemetery – Beit Olam in Hebrew – was acquired at Curraghkippane, on the outskirts of the cities, and some Jewish victims of the Lusitania disaster (a ship that sank in 1912 off the Old Head of Kinsale, Cork) are buried there.

At its peak of about 450-500 congregants, the community was very active.
Before the decline in numbers, there were two football clubs, a table tennis clubs, a debating club, a branch of the Bnei Akiva, as well as, of course, an officiating ‘Reverend’, a butcher, a doctor and a Chevre Kedushsa (burial society).

By 1939 the community had reached its peak. The sons and the grandsons of the peddlers and vicklemen had qualified as professionals in University College Cork and wanted to leave for a place with greater Jewish life and professional opportunities. There was also emigration to the State of Israel, established in 1948. The combination of emigration to Israel and the U.S. (among other destinations) resulted in a steady decline in number which persisted from the late 1930s until the 1980s, by which stage only 15 to 20 Jews remained in Cork, Ireland.
At present there are only two families left, as well as a scattering of Jews in the surrounding country, as well as transient visitors and businessmen who may come to pray at the shul.

Because of the decline in numbers, services are now only conducted every fourth Friday night, and during the High Holidays. Even during the High Holidays extras, in the form of Chabad-Lubavitch trainee Rabbis, have to be ‘imported’ from the U.K. to make a Jewish religious quorum (a ‘minyan’).

The Cork shul and the Jewish congregation have been featured in a number of online articles, some or all of which may be of interest if you are looking to know more about Jewish life in Cork.

The first wave of Jewish emigration to Cork was in 1772 with the influx of a small community of Sephardic Jews from Portugal.

Relatively little is known about this first community. Although they didn’t have a synagogue, a burial ground was discovered at Kemp Street, to the back of the present synagogue on number 10, South Terrace.

The community didn’t exceed about 40 in number, and disappeared through intermarriage with local Protestant families.
Written records from 1891 point to the emergence of a second Jewish community in Cork, following the assimilation of the previous Sephardic community. This community, by contrast, were Ashkenazi, coming (mostly) from a town called Yakmyan in Kovno (former White Russia).
It is very unlikely that Cork, Ireland, was the intended destination of these Eastern European émigrés. They had fled persecution (pogroms) in a staunchly Catholic Country.

Many among their ranks were also very religious. That they would willingly come to another stronghold of Catholicism, such as Ireland, with no traditional ties to Judaism, seems mostly unlikely. Among various explanations proposed, it may have been the case that an unscrupulous ship-captain advised the Jews to disembark and row to America to save money.
Possibly they confused ‘Cork’ for New York (the Jews spoke only Yiddish, and the words are – slighly – cognate). From Cobh (then Queenstown), where they disembarked, the Jews made their way into Cork City, and specifically settled in an area known as Hibernian Buildings, in the City Centre, soon to be known as ‘Jewtown’ by the locals.
This initial crop of Jews worked mostly as peddlers, selling door-to-door. They were known, amongst each other, as the vicklemen (vickle means weekly in Yiddish, and their door-to-door rounds took roughly a week). They would travel around Cork City and its hinterland knocking on doors and selling various things to the local Catholic farming community.

The community reached its peak in the early 20th Century. Family of the first arrivals soon followed when they found out that Cork, and Ireland in general, was tolerant, even friendly, towards the Jews. The community first prayed in a small room in Eastville before renting a room in Marlboro Street, and finally building the present synagogue at 10, South Terrace.

A Jewish cemetery – Beit Olam in Hebrew – was acquired at Curraghkippane, on the outskirts of the cities, and some Jewish victims of the Lusitania disaster (a ship that sank in 1912 off the Old Head of Kinsale, Cork) are buried there.

At its peak of about 450-500 congregants, the community was very active.
Before the decline in numbers, there were two football clubs, a table tennis clubs, a debating club, a branch of the Bnei Akiva, as well as, of course, an officiating ‘Reverend’, a butcher, a doctor and a Chevre Kedushsa (burial society).

By 1939 the community had reached its peak. The sons and the grandsons of the peddlers and vicklemen had qualified as professionals in University College Cork and wanted to leave for a place with greater Jewish life and professional opportunities.

At present there are only two families left, as well as a scattering of Jews in the surrounding country, as well as transient visitors and businessmen who may come to pray at the shul.

Because of the decline in numbers, services are now only conducted every fourth Friday night, and during the High Holidays. Even during the High Holidays extras, in the form of Chabad-Lubavitch trainee Rabbis, have to be ‘imported’ from the U.K. to make a Jewish religious quorum (a ‘minyan’).

The Cork synagoguge and the Jewish congregation have been featured in a number of online articles, some or all of which may be of interest if you are looking to know more about Jewish life in Cork.

Go > to > Sourcehttp://www.corkhebrewcongregation.com/history

Cork’s Jewish Community — Small in Size, Grand in Spirit (Marlena Thompson)

Gerald Goldberg (Wikipedia)

Cork Festival of Jewish Culture (Held in UCC, 2008)

Kosherme.net Entry

Folklore CD Series: Fred Rosehill

Cork’s Oldest Jew Reflect’s In Sadness [Article, Irish Times]

Vibrant Jewish Community in Irish City of Cork has Dwindled Away [Article, Seattle Times]

Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hebrews

Resources

Zmanim (halachic prayer times) for Cork.

Latest kosher product list (2012-2013) 

Google Maps listing

Websites

Irish Jewish Genealogical Society

Irish Jewish Museum

Articles, Media

A Place in Time, Ep. 5

History of the Jews in Ireland (Wikipedia)

Cork’s Jewish Community — Small in Size, Grand in Spirit (Marlena Thompson)

Gerald Goldberg (Wikipedia)

Cork Festival of Jewish Culture (Held in UCC, 2008)

Kosherme.net Entry

Folklore CD Series: Fred Rosehill

Cork’s Oldest Jew Reflect’s In Sadness [Article, Irish Times]

Vibrant Jewish Community in Irish City of Cork has Dwindled Away [Article, Seattle Times]

Jeroen Meus maakt een stoofpotje van ‘bavette’ en witbier

RECEPT De ‘bavette’ of rundervang, door de slager ook wel eens de ‘lap’ genaamd, is een bijzonder smakelijk en budgetvriendelijk stuk rundvlees, dat ideaal is voor stoofpotjes. Het wat grove vlees geeft zijn smaken langzaam af, en wordt in een paar uur tijd botermals – ideaal voor een dagje ‘slow cooking’ in de buitenlucht. Ik laat het smoren in een stevig blond bier.

Jeroen Meus © Verne.

Hoofdgerecht voor 4 personen:

– 800 g rundvlees (‘bavette’)
– 1 dikke ui
– 1 dikke wortel
– 3 rapen
– stam prei (wit)
– 5 stengels selder
– 8 kleine aardappelen (vastkokend)
– 3 teentjes look
– 2 takjes verse tijm
– 3 blaadjes laurier
– 2 flesjes blond kwaliteitsbier (bv. Tripel Karmeliet)
– 1l blanke kalfsfond (of kippenfond)
– paar takjes platte peterselie
– paar takjes kervel
– peper van de molen
– zout

Bereidingstijd:
20 minuten (+ 5 uur gaartijd)

Bereidingswijze:
Begin minstens 5 uur op voorhand. Steek het houtvuur aan.

Smelt een klont boter in een ruime ovenvaste stoofpot. Snij het vlees in grove stukken en kleur het goudbruin.

Pel de ui, schil de wortel en de rapen, snij in grove stukken en bak ze mee aan. Snij de groenten vooral niet in te kleine stukken, anders zijn ze veel te snel gaar en worden ze papperig.

Was de selder en het wit van de prei, snij in grote stukken en voeg toe.

Was de aardappeltjes en voeg ze ongeschild toe, samen met de gekneusde look, de tijm en de laurier. Roer om en laat enkele minuten stoven. Giet er het bier en de kalfsfond bij, kruid met peper van de molen en zout.

Sluit de pot af met een vel aluminiumfolie en zet er dan het deksel op. Laat zo’n 5 uur garen en controleer regelmatig of het vlees nog niet gaar is.

Zet de pot op tafel, strooi er wat verse peterselie en kervelblaadjes over en laat iedereen zelf opscheppen, in diepe borden. Outdoor cooking moet op z’n scouts! Drink er hetzelfde bier bij.

Je kan de stoofpot ook in de oven garen. Reken dan op 3 uur, op 150 °C.

Broodje ‘pulled pork & coleslaw’ van Jeroen Meus

© Verne.

RECEPT Pulled pork & coleslaw, dat klinkt als food voor cowboys. De Amerikanen zijn meester in alles wat met barbecueën en buitenkoken te maken heeft. Aan dit slow food broodje heb je heel weinig werk, maar het vlees moet wel de tijd krijgen om te garen – goed voor 8 uur (!) qualitytime met de maten. Heel zachtjesaan verandert die ‘gewone’ varkensschouder ondertussen in mals, sappig hapjesvlees. Ik geef er een frisse coleslaw bij, dat past perfect.

Jeroen Meus © Verne.

Hoofdgerecht voor 4 personen:

– 2 eetlepels bruine suiker
– 1 eetlepel lookpoeder
– 1 eetlepel komijnpoeder
– 1 eetlepel mild paprikapoeder
– 1 eetlepel gerookt paprikapoeder
– 1 eetlepel chilipoeder
– 1 koffielepel mosterdzaadjes
– 1,5 kg varkensschouder (ontbeend)
– 1 l appelsap
– 2 dl whisky
– 4 kleine ciabatta’s
– bosje bieslook
– zout

Voor de koolsla:
-1/4 witte kool
– 3 wortelen
– 1/2 rode ui
– 1 appel
– 2 à 3 eetlepels mayonaise
– 1 limoen
– peper van de molen
– zout

Extra materiaal:
– vijzel
– groenterasp

Bereidingstijd:
30 minuten (+ 8 uur gaartijd)

Bereidingswijze:
Begin 8 uur op voorhand! Steek het houtvuur aan.

Kneus de mosterdzaadjes in de vijzel.

Meng de bruine suiker, lookpoeder, komijnpoeder, paprikapoeders, chilipoeder en mosterdzaadjes met een kleine eetlepel zout.

Snij een te dikke vetrand van de varkensschouder wat bij, tot er een dunne laag vet overblijft. Maak er kruisgewijs een paar ondiepe insnijdingen in.

Rol het vlees in de kruidenmengeling en masseer de kruiden in. Leg in een ovenschaal en strooi er de restjes kruiden over.

Giet de helft van het appelsap en de whisky in de schaal, dek ze goed af met een vel aluminiumfolie en zet op het houtvuur. Reken op zo’n 8 uur garen.

Kijk regelmatig of er nog appelsap en whisky bij moet; laat de bodem niet uitdrogen. Het vlees mag wel een dikke, heel donkere korst krijgen.

Rasp de witte kool in grove slierten.

Schil de wortelen en de appel en rasp ze erbij; voeg de fijngesnipperde ui toe.

Meng er een eetlepel mayonaise onder en voeg meer toe naar smaak. Meng er het limoensap onder en kruid met peper en zout.

Haal het vlees van het vuur en pluk het draderige vlees helemaal uit elkaar met twee vorken (of je handen, opgelet, het is warm!).

Snijd de ciabatta’s overlangs in tweeën en rooster ze op het houtvuur, tot ze een krokant korstje hebben.

Lepel er een schep koolsla op en beleg met een dikke laag vlees. Werk af met fijngesnipperde bieslook en eet uit het vuistje.

Tips:
– Wil je dat het sneller gaat, gaar je pulled pork dan in de oven, eerst 2 uur onder aluminiumfolie, dan 2 uur zonder, continu op 150 °C. Reken op 5 à 7 cl appelsap en evenveel whisky.
– Een restje koolsla is de dag nadien minstens zo lekker.

MEXICAANSE BONENSOEP

27 oktober 2015 door 

Mexicaanse bonensoep
Ik ben een echte koukleum. Zodra de eerste koud de hoek om komt kijken, trek ik mijn dikke jas en handschoenen aan. Ik ben daarom, in de winter, echt gek op soep. Vaak maak ik een wat grote pan met soep, zodat ik voor een paar dagen genoeg heb (om mee te lunchen bijvoorbeeld). Eigenlijk had ik nog nooit eerder soep met bonen gemaakt, en waarom eigenlijk niet? Dit soepje viel namelijk goed in de smaak. Zelf houd ik wel van pittig en voeg ik graag een rode peper toe.

Recept voor 2 personen
Tijd: 25 min.
Benodigdheden:
  • 1 blik tomatenblokjes (circa 400 gr)
  • 1 rode ui
  • 2 tenen knoflook
  • snufje zout en peper
  • 1 tl paprikapoeder
  • 1 blikje kidneybonen (200 gr)
  • circa 500 ml water
  • 1 bouillonblokje (groenten)
  • 1 paprika
  • 1 blikje mais
  • evt. een rode peper of cayennepeperpoeder
Bereidingswijze:
Kook in een waterkoker het water. Snijd vervolgens de rode ui, de knoflook en de paprika in stukjes. Houd je van pittig? Snijd dan ook een rode peper in stukjes. Giet daarna een scheutje olie in een pan en voeg de ui, knoflook en paprika toe. Bak dit ongeveer 4-5 minuten op een zacht vuurtje. Daarna kun je de kidneybonen, tomatenblokjes, snufje zout en peper, paprikapoeder, het water en het bouillonblokje toevoegen. Laat de soep ongeveer 10 tot 15 minuten zachtjes pruttelen. Vervolgens pureer je de soep met een staafmixer. Zet de pan met soep terug op het vuur en voeg een blikje mais toe (het blikje heb je wel eerst afgegoten). Even mengen en klaar!
Eet smakelijk!
Mexicaanse bonensoep
Mexicaanse bonensoep
Sofie en Jorrit – 24 & 25 jaar – houden van lekkere en simpele gerechten en zijn hier dagelijks mee bezig – Eigenaar van de website Lekker en Simpel en het gelijknamige kookboek